Flat Out Scary: Mixing Business With Superstition

10 08 2012

Mixing business with superstitionA few days ago, I heard something that chilled me. To. The. Bone.

A new acquaintance complimented me on my 4-wheeled transport. Do you have goosebumps yet? No? Good, because that’s not the scary part.

I am fiercely proud of my car – not because it’s beautiful (it is), but because I worked so hard to make that purchase possible. Where one person sees a hunk of steel on wheels, I see restructuring MY life to give my BUSINESS life – long hours of mind-cramping design sessions, intense dedication to exceeding expectations, balancing precariously on the diplomatic highwire, sweating bullets over deadlines, epic mental battles with self-doubt, and more all-nighters than you can shake a stick at.

I shared an abbreviated version of this with the complimenting party, and she responded with:

“Oh, boy… you’re in trouble. It’s when you care about something that bad things happen. I couldn’t care less about my car – see? [gesturing grandly at a rusted out minivan] – and nothing’s happened to it.”

If the hair isn’t crawling on the back of your neck, check yourself for a pulse.

This kind of superstitious negativity is the antichrist of entrepreneurship (and, in my opinion, humanity). This is the reason – read: excuse – to hunker below sub-mediocrity. But if you don’t care about your business, who will?

As an entrepreneur, YOU DON’T DO mediocrity.

Contrary to hoodoo-voodoo beliefs, rational pride (emphasis on “rational”) in your achievements is NOT the beginning of the end. It’s a crucial element of business growth.  If you quake with each new customer, cringe at each dollar earned, and flatline every time you make a business conquest, your company – and you – will be lucky to survive a week.

I challenge you to place rational value in the things you’ve earned – whether it be money, success, fame, or the positive perks that result from them. You worked hard for these. They are motivators, and motivators are what give us drive to achieve, and continue achieving, greatness.

What are your thoughts regarding mixing business with superstition?

Next Blog: DMT Artistry’s business rebranding took a turn for the exciting, as I’ve just moved to my new office. For now, it’s a playground of cardboard boxes and construction materials, but it’s given me new incentive to put my logo on the renovation fast-track. I’ll be back in another 2 weeks with the next installment of The DMT Idea Board. Thanks for reading!

“I had only one superstition. I made sure to touch all the bases when I hit a home run.”  ~Babe Ruth

Dawn M. Tomczyk-Bhajan  |  DMT Artistry, LLC   |  www.DMTArtistry.com

All content Copyright © 2012 DMT Artistry, LLC, unless otherwise noted. All Rights Reserved.

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24 08 2012
Purple Revelations: The Joy of Impermanence « The DMT Idea Board

[…] Impermanence is not only less intimidating; it’s more realistic. It reduces waffling over decisions. (It should NOT, however, be used as an excuse to be, think, or act in a mediocre fashion. We already talked about mediocrity in last week’s blog.) […]

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